Experiment

For the EclipseMob experiment, you will make three recordings: the day before the eclipse, during the eclipse, and the day after the eclipse. These will be used to compare how the ionosphere behaves on a normal day to how it behaves during an eclipse.

 

The Day Before

On the day before the eclipse, you'll take a baseline measurement that can be compared against the eclipse day measurement.

 

  1. Try to make this measurement at about the same location and time of day as you plan to make the eclipse measurement. Plan to start about 45 minutes to an hour before the time of "peak eclipse" at your location.
  2. Make sure you have some space for a large file on your phone - your recording could be up to 500 MB.
  3. Set up your kit and align your antenna.
  4. Turn on your receiver circuit.
  5. Connect the TRRS cable to your receiver and your smartphone.
  6. Open the EclipseMob app.
  7. Press the big red "Record" button.
  8. Record for at least 10 minutes, and up to 1 hour. This is your baseline measurement, and we want to make sure we have a good snapshot of how the ionospheric conditions are on a normal day at your location.
  9. Don't worry if you can't see a spike in the graph at WWVB's frequency - you might not be able to receive it in the daytime. Your measurement is still important.
  10. Next time you're connected to WiFi, upload the file: tap the "History" tab in the app and find the file you recorded, click on it, then tap "Upload."
  11. Once the upload is successful, you can delete the file. Click on the file again and select "Delete" from the menu.

 

NOTE: The earphone gain (volume) of your phone should be set to full while you are recording.

 

Eclipse Day

On the eclipse day, we'll be looking at how ionospheric conditions change during the eclipse. Since these changes can start when the eclipse begins to affect any location along the path of radio wave propagation between you and the transmitter, we're taking a long recording for this one.

 

  1. Try to make this measurement at about the same location and time of day as you made the pre-eclipse measurement. Plan to start about 45 minutes to an hour before the time of "peak eclipse" at your location.
  2. Make sure you have some space for a large file on your phone - your recording could be up to 500 MB.
  3. Set up your kit and align your antenna.
  4. Turn on your receiver circuit.
  5. Connect the TRRS cable to your receiver and your smartphone.
  6. Open the EclipseMob app.
  7. Press the big red "Record" button.
  8. Record for at least 90 minutes, and up to 2 hours. 
  9. Don't worry if you can't see a spike in the graph at WWVB's frequency. Your measurement is still important.
  10. Next time you're connected to WiFi, upload the file: tap the "History" tab in the app and find the file you recorded, click on it, then tap "Upload."
  11. Once the upload is successful, you can delete the file. Click on the file again and select "Delete" from the menu.

 

NOTE: The earphone gain (volume) of your phone should be set to full while you are recording.

 

The Day After

On the day after the eclipse, you'll take another baseline measurement, just like the pre-eclipse measurement. We take baseline measurements both before and after in case there is some difference between the measurement conditions, like if the weather changes significantly.

 

  1. Try to make this measurement at about the same location and time of day as you made the eclipse measurement. Plan to start about 45 minutes to an hour before the time of "peak eclipse" at your location.
  2. Make sure you have some space for a large file on your phone - your recording could be up to 500 MB.
  3. Set up your kit and align your antenna.
  4. Turn on your receiver circuit.
  5. Connect the TRRS cable to your receiver and your smartphone.
  6. Open the EclipseMob app.
  7. Press the big red "Record" button.
  8. Record for at least 10 minutes, and up to 1 hour. This is your baseline measurement, and we want to make sure we have a good snapshot of how the ionospheric conditions are on a normal day at your location.
  9. Don't worry if you can't see a spike in the graph at WWVB's frequency - you might not be able to receive it in the daytime. Your measurement is still important.
  10. Next time you're connected to WiFi, upload the file: tap the "History" tab in the app and find the file you recorded, click on it, then tap "Upload."
  11. Once the upload is successful, you can delete the file. Click on the file again and select "Delete" from the menu.

 

NOTE: The earphone gain (volume) of your phone should be set to full while you are recording.

 

 

Download Experiment Instructions here.